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The Dispatcher

Vintage Jeep magazine reborn, 2015


 

Winter 2016/2017

Vol.2 No.4The Readers' Rides features are a highlight of the Winter issue. There are big photos of interesting Jeeps, including the FC-150 tow truck which is on the cover, photographed by Mark Smith at the 2016 Great Willys Picnic, where it made a big splash. By the way, this issue also has photo reports on four big Willys gatherings from fall 2016.

There are a couple of well-researched historical articles full of details I have not seen anywhere else: Dave Eiler's look at Laurel C. Worman and the Worman Jee-Cab hardtops, and Jim Allen's rundown on the "Forgotten Jeep", the FJ-3 Fleetvan.

Note: Norris-Banonis have announced that starting in 2017 all subscriptions will simply begin when they are paid for, rather than including all the past issues for that year. Some back issues are available for purchase, but not all.

Fall 2016

Vol.2 No.3 has several good stories on Readers' Rides, and several in-depth articles on unsusual Jeeps: the full story on the MAHL Jeep Loader, and detailed discussions of two AMC packages (the CJ-5 Super Jeep and the CJ-7 Limited.) There is a review by Fred Coldwell of Lloyd White's book on the Ford WWII jeeps, and an excerpt about arc welder jeeps from his Willys MB book. There is also a short piece on Walter Appel and his contributions to the VJ Jeepster, and an obituary for the late DJ-3A historian Bruce Agan.

Summer 2016

Vol.2 No.2The cover photo and centerpiece article in Vol.2 No.2 of The Dispatcher, is very timely for the many people who saw this rare Jeep at Willys shows last spring. Nicholas Oxender has prepared a well researched and illustrated 5-page story about his Navy jet-starting Jeep built by Valentine Welder & Manufacturing. You can see a bit more about this CJ-3A with F-head engine at 8th Annual Willys Jeep Rally on CJ3B.info.

Other highlights include John McCabe's piece addressing the question of when exactly is the 75th anniversary of the Jeep, Bob Westerman's look at experimental low-budget versions of the M38, and a tantalizingly brief portrait of designer Brooks Stevens, who had such an interesting career.

More subscriptions will help the magazine grow. New subscriptions anytime during 2016 will receive all four issues of Volume 2. And some of Volume 1 is available as back issues -- contact Norris-Banonis through their website.
 

Spring 2016

Vol.2 No.1
The second year of The Dispatcher begins with a smoking issue that says the magazine is here to stay, so you better subscribe or renew your subscription. No CJ-3Bs are featured, but many CJ3B.info readers will be interested in the centerpiece, Jim Allen's 5-page article on Art Gloss' early CJ-2A fire engine.

There are also a couple of other CJ-2A Reader's Ride features, and all the details I never knew about the 1971 Hurst Jeepster, in Bill Norris' article "Hurst Goes Commando".

Then the story of Walter P. Chrysler's brief but significant contract as General Manager of Willys in 1920-21, a photo piece on an incredibly well-preserved '62 CJ-5, and a book review of Paul Bruno's book about the Bantam Jeep project The First Jeep. Finally, a capsule history of Postal Jeeps, and Paul Barry's tech tips for putting your Jeep away for the winter and waking it up in the spring.

If you like Jeep history, you're going to enjoy this issue.
 

Vol.1 No.4

Vol.1 No.4The final issue for the first year (2015) of The Dispatcher continues what is already a tradition of interesting, well-illustrated historical articles based on original research. A good introductory article on the DJ-3A Dispatcher is followed by pieces on Jeeps used for automobile club roadside assistance, and the 1941 promotion of the Willys Quad, both of which have lots of photos you have never seen before. The same is true of the story of Blanche Stuart Scott, who drove across the U.S. in an Overland convertible in 1910.

Other articles include a tech piece on oil and fuel filters, and Mindy Christy's look behind the scenes of the Northern Ohio Flatfender Gathering (happening again this year on 11 September 2016.) A photo feature on the Colorado Fall Colors Tour is packed with great pictures, but it's too bad that space in The Dispatcher is a bit tight -- a color spread of 14 photos needs more than two pages.

Your support will help the magazine grow. New subscriptions anytime during 2016 will receive all four issues of Volume 2. And Volume 1 is probably available as back issues -- contact Norris-Banonis through their website.
 

Vol.1 No.3

Update: The September 2015 issue had the most pages and the biggest variety of articles yet. As well as several stories about Jeep collectors and events, there is a fascinating piece about attorney George W. Ritter and his role in Willys corporate history (and Empire tractors.) Also a photo story from the trails around Ouray CO by Jeff Petrowich, an introduction to the Borg-Warner overdrive, archival photos of tracked MB's, and a history of the Al-Toy promotional models by Colin Peabody and Glenn Byron.

Vol.1 No.2

The second issue of The Dispatcher was published in June 2015. Features include: a simple but comprehensive guide on doing a 6 to 12-volt conversion; a detailed look at the massive Schramm air compressors which could be installed as a factory option on almost any Jeep from the 1940's to 1960s; a photo album of the Marine Corps' deep-water fording tests of the M715; and a history of Pope Manufacturing Company, whose Toledo automobile plant later became the Willys-Overland factory. (By the way, The Toledo Blade recently remarked that it's too bad Pope Manufacturing isn't around anymore, because they would be the ideal company to build the Popemobile for Pope Francis' 2015 visit.)

Vol.1 No.1

Vol.1 No.1The last time I reviewed a new Jeep magazine and gave it a thumbs-up, it went belly-up soon after, so I'm hesitant to jinx another one. But that was nearly ten years ago, and the publishers were facing a market that was just discovering the internet, and then a huge recession.

The prevailing wisdom in 2015 on the other hand, is that there are now real opportunities for niche publications to find readers who want something they can hold in their hands. And as mainstream print media struggle to find advertisers, who are increasingly buying exposure online, small magazines with a very specific audience are able to sell targeted advertising.

So this seems like a good time for Norris-Banonis to launch their version of The Dispatcher. They have always said that their Jeep calendars are "nice enough for your coffee table", but the fact is that most of us put the calendars on the wall, so we are in need of something Willys-related for the coffee table or the bathroom.

Norris-Banonis is offering a free copy of their first issue (left) if you send them an e-mail -- contact information is below.
 

2011The Dispatcher was around for many years as a top-quality club newsletter (right) published quarterly by West Coast Willys. But the organization was loooking for someone to take it over, and Norris-Banonis saw it as a logical step from their calendar business. They decided to make the magazine a little larger and glossier, and undertake to market it more aggressively.

They are sticking with the quarterly publication schedule, and also retaining the policy of free classified ads for subscribers.
 

ArticleThe plan is for the magazine to feature well-researched historical and technical articles, and in fact there is a real value in putting this kind of material on paper. We're used to consulting websites for information, but websites are actually ephemeral and require constant support -- they can disappear overnight.

The first issue of the new Dispatcher includes an article by Paul Barry of Willys America, on maintaining Willys steering systems (left).
 

ArticleAnother article is an excellent piece of historical research by Bob Westerman, describing the testing by the U.S. Army of M38 and M38A1 Jeeps with automatic transmissions (left).

There's also an article by Fred Coldwell on the CJ-1 and CJ-2, and a Readers' Rides section. And a biography of Claude Cox, founder of Overland Automotive, which is an example of Norris-Banonis' intention to include Willys-Overland history from the pre-Jeep era.
 

I recommend The Dispatcher highly, to anybody who has the occasional inclination to curl up with some reading on paper rather than on a screen, and then be able to file it away on a shelf for future reference. -- Derek Redmond

For subscription information, see The Dispatcher on the Norris-Banonis website. You can also e-mail them to request a free issue -- put "sample copy request" in the subject line.


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Last updated 15 February 2017 by Derek Redmond redmond@cj3b.info
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All content not credited and previously copyright, is copyright Derek Redmond