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Driving in 4-Wheel Drive


 

Transfer Case Operation

From the dash plateChuck Wootton provided this description of how to use the Dana/Spicer Model 18 transfer case shifters: "The left hand, longer shift lever is for 2WD or 4WD. 2WD is in the forward position, 4WD is in the rear position. The right hand, shorter shift lever is for high range, neutral, and low range. The transfer case must be in 4WD in order to shift into low range. The short lever when in the rear position is in high range. One notch forward is the neutral position where the drive shafts are disconnected from the transmission gears. The next notch forward is for low range."
 
 

SticksThis photo shows the two transfer case shifters beside the gearshift in Rankine Roth's 1960 CJ-3B, in 2WD high range position.

If you think this is complicated, check out Six Sticks in Dixie, a 1962 CJ-3B with a Warn overdrive added, plus front and back power takeoff shafts, requiring a grand total of six shifters.
 

'53 3BThis photo shows 14-year-old John Ashley getting some clutch lessons on Jeff Heidman's CJ-3B in Georgia. Knowing when to use and when not to use the clutch, is important off road (see "Down Hill" in the Owner's Manual below.) As Jim Allen says in the Four Wheeler's Bible, "Above all, don't ride the clutch any more than you must. Except for the actual moment of the shift, keep your left foot flat on the fllor -- if it's not on the brake."
 

JohnJohn demonstrates proper non-power-steering-Jeep driving, with his thumbs outside the steering wheel, in case of kickback when the wheels run into something unexpected.
 

From the 1963 Owners's Manual

Owner's Manual

Thanks to Dan Fedorko for scanning this page. -- Derek Redmond

Also on CJ3B.info, see the 1960 Willys booklet How to Use Four-Wheel Drive.


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Last updated 22 August 2009 by Derek Redmond redmond@cj3b.info
http://cj3b.info/Tech/4WDDriving.html
All content not credited and previously copyright, is copyright Derek Redmond